Welcome to my overview of women in country music, with reviews ranging from folk and bluegrass to honkytonk, rockabilly and Nashville pop. This is the first page covering the letter "T"











A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T / T-2 | U | V | W | X, Y & Z | Comps

Liz Talley "Road To You" (Armadillo, 2006)


Liz Talley "More Than Satisfied" (Diamond Music Group, 2009)
(Produced by Doug Deforest)

Rock-solid, old-school hard country from a Texas gal who may have a fairly rough voice, but flawless taste when it comes to real-deal, uptempo honky-tonk and western-swing twang. The credits on this album are instructive: to begin with, she sings a duet with an often-overlooked '70s old-timer, Tony Booth, and she covers songs by Melba Montgomery, Leona Williams and Bob McDill, as well as a couple of gems by Becky Hobbs (whose own "country-ness" often gets lost on her own albums, but comes out loud and clear in Talley's heartfelt performances) and a nice twang-tune from Lacy J. Dalton ("You Can't Take The Texas Out Of Me"). She reprises her version of Asleep At The Wheel's "Bump Bounce Boogie," a western-swing toe-tapper that was previously featured as a bonus track on her last album, and shows her affinity for western swing, a style that her compact band really does nicely. This is authentic, self-produced Texas country, by an earthy local artist with a knack for promoting other talented folks who may be a bit off the radar. Recommended!


Tarnation "Gentle Creatures" (4AD, 1995/1999)
San Francisco's reigning mid-1990s alt.country diva, Paula Frazier's approach to the whole "twangcore" equation is much like a softer, more controlled version of Freakwater -- but instead of channelling some speed-crazed version of the Carter Family, Frazier's sound is more like a mix of Patsy Cline and Lee Hazelwood. The slowcore drone winds up being a good foil for her voice, which, despite its ardent devotees, is a somewhat limited instrument. Tarnation is/was an artsy band that made good use of its own strengths and judiciously sidestepped its shortcomings. I always liked their earlier stuff best, where awkwardness was still a virture, and the twang slightly more bouncy. "Game Of Broken Hearts," which opens this album, is still a stunning ballad... as this disc grinds on, though, into more Red House Painter-y terrain, I find my attention starts to wander...


Tarnation "Mirador" (4AD, 1997)


(Paula Frazer &) Tarnation "Now It's Time" (Birdman, 2007)



Holly Tashian -- see artist discography


Dulcie Taylor "Other Side Of The Bed" (2001)


Dulcie Taylor "Diamond And Glass" (Mesa, 2002)


Dulcie Taylor "Mirrors And Windows" (Black Iris, 2004)
(Produced by Mark Thayer)

A nice mix of folk and twang, with a healthy dose of '70s-ish soft-rock in there as well... The opening track, "Blackberry Winter," starts off with plenty of steel-laced country and subtly slips into an elegant Byrds-style electric guitar solo. A bouncy blues vibe eases its way into the rest of the record, bring to mind folks like Maria Muldaur, Ray Bonneville, Delany & Bonnie and others, building on the rootsy eclecticism of the old country-rock era. If this piques your interest, this disc is definitely worth checking out.


Mary Taylor "Mary Taylor's Very First Album" (Dot, 1971) (LP)
(Produced by Joe Allison)

Despite the humiliatingly banal album title, this old LP has some interesting touches, although overall it hints at a sad story. The blonde, beaming Taylor was an early-70s also-ran who sang at county fairs and apparently was a cast member on Hee-Haw -- for one season -- but she also was a talented songwriter and a fine singer. This album seems to have been cobbled together from various studio sessions and what must have originally been demo recordings (the sound quality on the sessions run by Billy Mize is rather muffled, although the rest of the album is not...) On a few tunes, Taylor's heart hardly seems in it, but on others she's perky and quite fun... One track made me laugh out loud: in the middle of a so-so rendition of "Flowers On The Wall," she stops cold and tells the band, "give me an 'A'," then segues into "Hava Nagila," which is as funny as it is absurd. Taylor also apparently wrote "Queen Of The House" (a minor hit for Jody Miller) as well as "The Bridge I Tried To Burn," which is a first-rate country weeper. I'm not sure, but i suspect that Taylor's full story would be rather interesting to hear... And was there ever an album #2?


Chalee Tennison "Chalee Tennison" (Elektra/Asylum, 1999)
Apparently Tennison has real working class roots and admirers from within the rootsy end of the country community... I've heard her hailed as a return to the good old days, a rural-voiced throwback to the days of Melba and Dolly, and wil admit that in her rootsier moments, she sounds sort of like Reba McEntire did in her early years. But the arrangements on the opening tracks undercut her claim to the new roots throne; some songs like "Handful Of Water" and "It Ain't So Easy" are quite nice, but the drippy ballads ("I Can Feel You Drifting," "Leave It At That," "Someone Else's Turn To Cry") are absolutely dreadful. Midway between these two points are a few decent Tammy Wynette-ish countrypolitan ditties like "Just Because She Lives There," where she brings the lyrics home with a heartfelt delivery. On the whole, though, even with the rugged, rural voice, Tennison is wa-a-a-ay too popped-up for me. Mostly, this is the same old overproduced Nashville stuff.


Chalee Tennison "This Woman's Heart" (Warner Brothers, 2000)
Blech! A slow-paced, lethargic, Wynonna-esque set of glossy high-tech weepers packed with swelling synthesizer lead-ins and bombastic, rock-tinged drums and electric guitars. Way too overproduced, monotonously introspective and far too serious. Humorless in the extreme, as a matter of fact -- the most interesting song on here is "Makin' Up With You," about a couple that likes to fight (and have make-up sex afterwards)... This track is followed, figuratively, by "We Don't Have To Pray," about the aftermath of a family splitting apart when the no-good dad hits the highway. (Interesting lyrics but terrible, crashing, clamorous musical backdrop...) I suppose there is an emotional rawness to this album that redeems it, but the music is so overblown I can't stand to listen to it. Not my cup of tea.


Chalee Tennison "Parading In The Rain" (Dreamworks, 2003)
(Produced by James Stroud)

I simply can't find anything nice to say about this record... I don't like her voice, the music is super-generic and prefab, the songs mostly sound alike, and the lyrics are artless and bluntly crafted. I suppose this album is inoffensive in a muzak-y way, but that's about as much praise as I can muster for this one. I don't get her appeal.


Texana Dames "Texana Dames" (Amazing Records, 1992)
This all-female trio was a spinoff of the fabled West Texas group, the Supernatural Family Band, which included mother Charlene Hancock, and siblings Traci and Conni Hancock.


Texas Ruby & Curly Fox "A Memorial Tribute" (Binge Disc)
Rare mid-1940s recordings from one of the Grand Ole Opry's mainstay duos. Uptempo lost-love songs galore, along with hot fiddle breakdowns by Curly Fox (who started his career in the Skillet Lickers string band, and kept the old- timey flavor alive.) Ruby's intensely masculine voice is a bit unnerving -- she sounds like a nineteen year old boy auditioning for the band -- but the material is priceless. The musicianship is particularly high on these recording, mostly from old Columbia sessions, as well as a few Opry airchecks. You can't find this stuff anywhere else, so track this one down.


Texas Ruby & Curly Fox "Fantastic Fiddlin' Fun And Songs" (Starday)


Texas Ruby & Curly Fox "A Memorial Tribute" (Binge Disc)
Rare mid-1940s recordings from one of the Grand Ole Opry's mainstay duos. Uptempo lost-love songs galore, along with hot fiddle breakdowns by Curly Fox (who started his career in the Skillet Lickers string band, and kept the old- timey flavor alive.) Ruby's intensely masculine voice is a bit unnerving -- she sounds like a nineteen year old boy auditioning for the band -- but the material is priceless. The musicianship is particularly high on these recording, mostly from old Columbia sessions, as well as a few Opry airchecks. You can't find this stuff anywhere else, so track this one down.


Texas Ruby & Curly Fox "We May Meet Again Someday" (BACM)


Texas Ruby "Teardrops In My Heart" (Righteous, 2010)


Texas Ruby & Curly Fox "Essential Masters" (Rockabilly Records, 2011)


Texas Ruby "Cowgirl Classics" (Rockabilly Records, 2011)


Linda Thompson "Versatile Heart" (Rounder, 2007)
(Produced by Edward Haber & Teddy Thompson)

Bookended by two gentle instrumentals, this album showcases British folk doyenne Linda Thompson's continued mastery of her craft. Although this acoustic-based album isn't as giddily joyful or as puckish as her previous release, Fashionably Late, it is packed with finely crafted gems such as the sardonic title track, one of several new songs cowritten with her son, Teddy Thompson, and a number of intelligently wrought folksongs. The overall mood here is rather doleful and resigned, a reflection, perhaps, of the times, as Thompson references the Iraq war a few times, including in the moving Tom Waits-Kathleen Brennan tune, "Day After Tomorrow." Thompson makes the most of her connections in English trad scene, bringing in accordionist John Kirkpatrick, as well as Eliza Carthy and the Waterson clan (on "Bob Copper And Me," a lovely tribute to one of England's finest singers of traditional song). On a few tunes she also hosts Irish guitarist John Doyle, who is fast becoming his generation's version of bassist Danny Thompson, a seemingly ubiquitous player whose fluid style and solid reliability adds magic to every track he graces. This is another strong effort from Ms. Thompson, more on the traditional side this time around, but still a real treat.


Thompson Square "Thompson Square" (Stoney Creek, 2011)
Top Forty country from the husband and wife duo of Keifer and Shawna Thompson...



Sue Thompson -- see artist discography


Eric & Suzy Thompson "Adam And Eve Had The Blues" (Arhoolie, 1989)
Nice stuff from the San Francisco folkie contingent. A relaxed set which ranges from backporch acoustic folk-blues to soft-edged cajun waltzes and a bit of old-timey music thrown in for good measure. Not earthshaking, but that's kinda the point.


Suzy Thompson "No Mockingbird" (Native & Fine, 2003)
A nice, soulful offering from fiddler Suzy Thompson, a veteran of bands as diverse as the Any Old Time String Band, The California Cajun Orchestra and the Klezmorim, whose repertoire ranges from old bluegrass and old-time stringband music to acoustic blues and a touch of klezmer and cajun. She's joined here, on her first solo album, by a talented battery of (mostly) SF Bay Area musicians -- the esteemed Mike Seeger, banjoist Bill Evans, Maria & Geoff Muldaur, Kate Brislin and Jody Stecher, Eric Thompson, bassist Steven Strauss and others. It's a nice, understated set, with plenty of fine performances. Recommended.


Suzy Thompson "Stop & Listen" (Arhoolie, 2005)
Following up on her previous solo album from 2004, veteran Bay Area fiddler Suzy Thompson leaves the 'grass behind and sticks to the blues, cutting loose on this fine live set, with pickin' that leans towards the Delta... It's an open-ended love letter to the folkie/blues in-crowd... Thompson has worn many musical hats over the years, but this disc highlights her at her bluesiest, in sort of a Maria Muldaur mode, backed by longtime partner Eric Thompson and the Thompson String Ticklers... Nice rapport with her hometown crowd, too, down at Berkeley, California's fabled folk club, the Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse.


Eric & Suzy Thompson "Dream Shadows" (Herringbone Disc, 2008)


Cyndi Thomson "My World" (Capitol, 2001)
(Produced by Paul Worley & Tommy Lee James)


Marsha Thornton "Marsha Thornton" (MCA, 1989)
(Produced by Owen Bradley)


Marsha Thornton "Maybe The Moon Will Shine" (MCA, 1991)
(Produced by Steve Fishell)


Marsha Thornton "Farther Along -- Acapella Hymns Of Farewell" (Metronome, 2003)


Three Fox Drive "Listen To The Music" (Koch, 2005)
Well, yes, the title track actually is a cover of the old 1970s Doobie Brothers hit... But let's not hold that against them. (It coulda been worse: they could have done "China Grove"! ) Anyhoo, 3 Fox Drive are a swell progressive bluegrass outfit from upstate New York, bulit around the vocal and instrumental work of Kim, Barb and Joel Fox (on guitar, vocals and banjo, respectively...) These Foxes are continuing the legacy of their earlier band, the Fox Family bluegrass band, which put out a couple of albums in the '90s... This is fine music, with strong picking and innovative, yet solidly rootsy, arrangements... I think most contemporary 'grass fans will enjoy this album quite a bit.. There is an occasional sluggishness to their tempo and meter, but overall, this is pretty nice stuff. Folks who like Alison Krauss, Laurie Lewis and even Dolly Parton's recent acoustic outings will probably want to check this out.


Three Fox Drive "FestivaLink Presents 3 Fox Drive At Wintergrass: 2/24/07" (FestivaLink, 2005)


3 Of Hearts "3 Of Hearts" (RCA, 2001)




Hillbilly Fillies - More Letter "T"



Hick Music Index
Sisters Who Swung: Women In Jazz & Blues



Copyright owned by Slipcue.Com.  All Rights Reserved.  
Unauthorized use, reproduction or translation is prohibited.